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Little Hatshepsut Like a miracle, a light rain had drifted in from the sea. The sea was a long, long way off and Ahmes looked at it as if it was strange emissary from Hapi . Rain was rare in her world. Little pock marks on the river below her. It looked pretty but she still thought the rain was sad. It was also a little cold, and Ahmes retreated beneath the roof of the shrine… Still she could see the water below her. The river did not mind the rain at all; it simply took those pock marks and swallowed them up. The river is, it just is, she thought… I should not be sad either. But she was. She sat in her family’s shrine on the low cliff above the river, a favourite spot of hers. From here you could watch the fishing boats with their nets or spearmen in the bow, or you saw a full moon ride the river and thought of sesame cakes and feasts when no work was done, or you could watch the river race and froth across the lowlands on the other side. It was Hapi’s gift; the flood with its rich silts and water. It grew the barley her family made into beer, the beer had made her family well to do and so they had a shrine to Hapi on the low cliff above the water near where they’d build their new house...

Excerpt from ‘Plagued’ book 1 – Viral government

And is he a murderer? If you live in the Arabian peninsula, he certainly must be, common logic has it. The C.S. drone strike Bridge ordered on Assyrian commander Kalaa Inmani Suk a little over 2 weeks ago has been labelled an act of Terrorism by Assyria’s leader, Qassim Mohammed Kaan. The Assyrians have sent the case to the world court in Amnstahm, Nederlands. They have backing from Norda, Albane, Sweda and Belgrada (which probably doesn’t mean all that much to America’s government). 

Stephen J Kimber – why I write

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08XFVWYBX Why does anyone write? 'Tis a lonely, often bruising affair, sometimes filled with self loathing. Then again, it lets you inhabit myriad worlds, most of them perhaps better (though, you fear, lacking depth) than the one we've somehow found ourselves in. The Literary Hub notes 33 writers on why they write; surprise, surprise - … Continue reading Stephen J Kimber – why I write

Buy it…?

16 year old Nick Seche is a gamer, a nerd. It's 2024 and Seche wins a beta trial of a new tech, sensory-immersing gaming unit and program from innovative gaming guru, Daichi Arata, head of Phantom Gaming. It's a game apparently locked in the mundanity of small-town USA but Arata's game promises so much more. It goes way beyond the virtual and plunges Nick into a world that becomes scarily not at all everyday. Via the game’s sensors and lightspeed technology Seche lives and breathes his character, Norman Mene. And things in his own world (Sydney Australia) begin to resonate with the world of Burris (the small mid-west town where the game is set); the game spirals out of control, Pleasantville meets Gremlins - hackers made substantial, gamers intruding on game space and politics out of control in downtown main street. In the meantime, back in Sydney, Seche is contacted via a strange entity he dubs the voice. Via the voice he is led to believe that the game is a simulation environment which allows sinister background entities to data mine players. It may be gaming but the stakes are real world - and Nick Seche is a guinea pig.

Malleable published by moi…

Made a quick promo film for the book: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FLocqrNqmvU Sixteen year old Nick Seche is a gamer, a nerd.  It's 2024 and Seche wins a beta trial of a new tech, sensory immersive gaming unit and program from innovative gaming guru, Daichi Arata, head of Phantom Gaming. It's a game apparently locked in the mundanity … Continue reading Malleable published by moi…

An alternative truth

The opening of a novella about this pandemic; just set somewhere else entirely.In a world with alternative truths what we would perhaps prefer is an alternative world on which to trial them. Part 1 - Beginnings December 13 Nahuw, Anihc Moon is about to place an Uggo piece into what he hopes will be a … Continue reading An alternative truth

Review of Tom Strelich’s novel, Dog logic

Dog logic; it makes sense Some stories remind us not to take ourselves too seriously, to curb our hubris; perhaps remind us how invidious we can be. ‘Dog logic’ is dystopian, sort of, a book about a man, Hertell, wounded by the now (wits scrambled, wife left, career in ruins) and out of sorts. He … Continue reading Review of Tom Strelich’s novel, Dog logic